Archive for December, 2008

Prison maintenance supervisor stabbed by inmate

Posted in Prison assaults on December 31, 2008 by cosgoingwrong

PENDLETON, Ind. (AP) – Authorities say a prison maintenance supervisor was stabbed in the leg and lower body by a convicted murderer.

A spokesman for the Pendleton Correctional Facility says Joseph Neill suffered 10 puncture wounds in the attack Monday morning. He was treated at a hospital in Anderson and returned to work later in the day.

Prison spokesman Neil Potter says 49-year-old Jeffrey Treadway used a “homemade weapon” to stab Neill. Treadway was transferred to another maximum-security facility.

Potter says Treadway stabbed Neill because Neill had filed a disciplinary report against Treadway for theft.

source

http://www.local12.com/news/state/story/Prison-maintenance-supervisor-stabbed-by-inmate/oIAw52je6E6gOr2ie8TdVg.cspx?rss=31

No ‘jumping for joy’ over corrections contract: NSGEU

Posted in Articles on December 31, 2008 by cosgoingwrong

The largest union in Nova Scotia worries that a new contract for correctional workers signals rocky times for other unionized employees about to negotiate with the province.

An arbitration board recently awarded correctional workers a 2.9 per cent wage hike each year, retroactive to November 2006.

But this doesn’t keep correctional employees in the province in line with their colleagues at jails across Canada, the Nova Scotia Government and General Employees Union said Tuesday.

In addition, said NSGEU president Joan Jessome, the arbitrator cited Nova Scotia’s large debt and troubled economic times as reasons for not giving workers a larger wage increase.

Jessome said this doesn’t bode well for other locals and unions about to try to secure their own settlements.

“We’re not jumping for joy by any means,” she told CBC News.

“It’s obvious that the arbitrator took the changes in the economy into consideration when she made her decision, and that makes us a little bit nervous considering we are going into a big round of bargaining.”

Jessome said health-care workers, university staff and Cape Breton Regional Police will all be at the negotiating table in 2009.

Correctional workers had to accept an arbitrated settlement because they don’t have the right to strike, she said.

source

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/nova-scotia/story/2008/12/30/nsgeu-correctional.html?ref=rss

Governor names new corrections commissioner

Posted in Articles on December 31, 2008 by cosgoingwrong

MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) – Andrew Pallito has been named commissioner of the Vermont Department of Corrections.

Drugs found in jail parking lot, two arrested

Posted in Articles on December 31, 2008 by cosgoingwrong

HOPKINS CO., KY (WFIE)- In Hopkins County, two men are arrested on drug charges.

State police say an ongoing drug investigation led them to a vehicle in the parking lot of the jail.

State police say they found marijuana and a large amount of cash in the car.

Clide Craigen, 53 of Missouri and Charles McDonald, 63 of Memphis, are both charged with possession.

source

http://www.14wfie.com/global/story.asp?s=9594939

Washington mulls deporting jailed illegal aliens

Posted in Articles on December 31, 2008 by cosgoingwrong

SEATTLE (AP) — Washington Gov. Chris Gregoire wants illegal immigrants serving time in state jails deported, a move intended to save the state more than $9 million in the next two-year budget.

The deportation proposal is modeled after a program in Arizona that has saved the state more than $18.5 million since 2005, said Eldon Vail, Secretary of the state Department of Corrections. Continue reading

Virginia’s prisons charge too much for inmates’ calls

Posted in Articles on December 31, 2008 by cosgoingwrong

I am concerned about the inmate phone system in our commonwealth.

Under the current system, families of inmates are assessed a surcharge of $2.85 per call in addition to the usual collect call rates. One phone call, which is limited to 20 minutes, can easily cost between $10 and $20. If a mother wished to speak with each of her two daughters once a week, it could cost her family $160 each month, not including any conversations with her husband or parents!

At such rates, Virginia’s General Fund has received more than $6 million in revenue from some of our state’s most vulnerable families, and has effectively prohibited others from maintaining contact with their loved ones (more than 80 percent of our women in prison are mothers).

Studies have shown that children who maintain contact with their incarcerated parent are less likely to become incarcerated. With the epidemic of incarceration in our nation, changing the current inmate phone system is a way we can actively interrupt the generational cycle of those who enter prison.

Other states and our federal prisons have phone systems that are far more family-friendly. Perhaps a system akin to the federal inmate phone system could be implemented. Federal inmates purchase phone cards from the inmate canteen for three cents per minute. Equipment maintenance could be assessed to the inmate as a surcharge on the phone card.

With so many creative people in Virginia, surely there is a way to implement a socially just system.

source

http://www.starexponent.com/cse/news/opinion/letters_to_the_editor/article/virginias_prisons_charge_too_much_for_inmates_calls/26809/

Arsenic levels too high in Kern Valley State Prison’s drinking water

Posted in Articles on December 31, 2008 by cosgoingwrong
Three years past deadline, California has no solid plan to reduce the arsenic, which has been linked to cancer. Officials spent money to design a filtration plant and then decided not to build it

Reporting from Delano — Beside a field of rolling tumbleweed in this remote Central Valley town, the state opened its newest prison in 2005 with a modern design, cutting-edge security features and a serious environmental problem.

The drinking water pumped from two wells at Kern Valley State Prison contained arsenic, a known cause of cancer, in amounts far higher than a federal safety standard soon to take effect. Continue reading